HEADER
  • Little Saigon

    Little Saigon and Tendernob

    Little Saigon and the Tendernob are two Tenderloin neighborhoods that are home to large immigrant populations and some of the best food in the city. Join us as we take you on the only food tour of this district and explore the flavors of Asia, the Middle East, and beyond!
  • The Mission

    The Mission District

    San Francisco's 1st neighborhood, The Mission District is still the heart & soul of this vibrant city. This area is so rich in culture, that we have 4 Mission food tours & 2 neighborhood walks.
  • North Beach

    North Beach

    North Beach is that rare thing -- a neighborhood that manages to be a perennial hit with tourists, and also to remain beloved by San Franciscans. It's San Francisco's Little Italy and the home of the beatniks.
  • Scenic Running

    Scenic Running

    Just a short run from the urban landscape of San Francisco's busy city streets you will find numerous trails and parks offering phenomenal views of the Golden Gate Bridge, the City Skyline and other gems.
  • Chinatown

    Chinatown

    Established in the 1840s, San Francisco's Chinatown is the oldest Chinatown in North America and the largest Chinese community outside Asia. Our food and walking tours are 2nd to none.
  • Parrots!

    Parrots!

    Wild Parrots in San Francisco? Yes there are officially at least two flocks of wild Parrots here. These Parrots have evolved into a brand new species of parrot indigenous to San Francisco.

SF Bay Area Blogs

San Francisco concerts that changed the nation.

 BY: COLLIN BRENNAN | 9.4.2015 |

Originally this article by Collin Brennan had 5 concerts listed, I have added a couple more.

San Francisco concerts have long reflected the music of the times, but the inverse is also true: time and time again, music has revolved around whatever’s going on in San Francisco. This was most apparent in the 1960s, when bands like the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane turned the hippie counterculture into the city’s greatest export. Five decades later, we can look back and identify five concerts that changed American music forever—an inventory of five San Francisco nights that defined San Francisco nightlife.

 

The Beatles at Candlestick Park    
August 29, 1966
The San Francisco concert was their last
beatles

Nobody but the Beatles knew that this show at chilly Candlestick Park would be their last live concert performance ever. If it had been announced ahead of time, the Fab Four might have sold the place out. Instead, large swaths of seats were left unsold for the final date of their fourth and final North American tour. It was a strangely low-key farewell for the most popular rock band of all time, who occasionally paused their 11-song set to snap pictures with a camera they had brought on stage. It was the end of an era in many ways, and it paved the way for the decade’s latter half and the Summer of Love, which would take shape in San Francisco less than a year later.

 

The Human Be-In at Golden Gate Park
January 14, 1967
human

The Summer of Love actually started with this mid-winter event at Golden Gate Park, just a stone’s throw from the Haight-Ashbury district that would soon become synonymous with the counterculture. Inspired by sit-ins taking place at lunch counters, colleges, and universities across the country during the early 1960s, the Human Be-In was perhaps the first focused expression of the hippie movement. California had recently passed a law banning LSD, and everyone from poet Allen Ginsberg to psychologist Timothy Leary showed up to encourage a crowd of thousands to “turn on, tune in, drop out.” Of course, no celebration of hippiedom would be complete without bands like the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane, both of whom found their way onto the bill.

 

Aretha Franklin at Fillmore West
March 5–7, 1971
aretha

Though people tend to associate San Francisco with the hippie counterculture, the city has long been a haven for jazz and soul. From Jelly Roll Morton to John Coltrane, musicians would flock to play the clubs on Fillmore Street, and their hundreds of legendary concerts exist now only in memory. This is not the case with Aretha Franklin’s three-night set at Fillmore West, which eventually became one of the best live albums of its era. The Queen of Soul dove right in with her hit song “Respect,” but she filled out her set with such hippie standbys as the Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby” and Simon and Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water.” In doing so, she bridged the gap between the counterculture and modern American soul in a way that few singers had ever attempted.

 

The Band at Winterland Ballroom
November 25, 1976

Another San Francisco concert that’s been immortalized for new generations to enjoy, the Band’s farewell show at Winterland Ballroom is considered one of the greatest concerts, period. Martin Scorsese‘s documentary film The Last Waltz captured the Band in all their fading glory, but they weren’t the only ones to take the stage that night. Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, the Staples Singers, and Van Morrison were among the special guests on hand, making this arguably the most star-studded affair in San Francisco’s history.

 

The Sex Pistols at Winterland Ballroom
This San Francisco concert was their last
January 14, 1978

sexp
The Sex Pistols, one of the most influential rock bands ever, the biggest punk act to come out of England, played their biggest concert, and their last show at Winterland in SF. In just a few months Winterland would be closed and demolished, Sid Vicious would be dead in about a year, and by 1979 punk was exploding around the world, although many will say that punk died on this night in SF.
The two week tour in America, was plagued by poor planning and predictably violent reactions, the group’s bass player, Sid Vicious, paved the way toward a whole new level of decadence. During the band’s engagement in Memphis early in the tour, Vicious, now addicted to heroin, went in search of a connection and was later found in a local hospital with the words “Gimme a fix” carved into his chest with a razor. He engaged in numerous fights both on and off stage, sustaining numerous other injuries as the tour progressed.
The tour eventually culminated in the high profile gig in San Francisco, where concert promoter Bill Graham convinced McLaren that the band was popular enough to play Winterland, dwarfing any performance the band had previously attempted by far. This now legendary concert, the biggest of the group’s career, would also turn out to be the Sex Pistols‘ last. Headlining a triple bill that included local punk bands the Nuns (featuring a young Alejandro Escovedo) and the Avengers (featuring a young Penelope Houston), this night would prove to be an extraordinary theatrical event and the Sex Pistols’ final gig before a sold-out audience of 5000. Due to local demand, the Sex Pistols set was also simulcast on KSAN radio, where it would be heard live by thousands of additional listeners and would soon circulate far and wide, becoming the most ubiquitous bootleg recording of the group.
Evaluating this Sex Pistols’ performance in terms of music is a relatively pointless exercise, as the band had no desire to please the audience in terms of music, nor could they even play well in any traditional sense. The performance, devoid of pacing, range, tempo, or melody, is instead an onslaught of rage, rebellion, and release, which is relentlessly ragged throughout the set
At first it appeared the band would not do an encore,  but amidst roars for more, the Pistols return to the stage and launch into a cover of the Stooges‘ “No Fun.” This eventually culminates with Rotten hunched on the stage, screaming “No Fun!” over and over. The song comes to an abrupt halt and in his most insinuating manner, Rotten poses the question that has by now become infamous, “Ever get the feeling you’ve been cheated?” before smirking a final “Goodnight” and the band leaving the debris-strewn stage… for good.
Whether you loved them or hated them , the Sex Pistols created one of the great paradigm shifts in modern music, forever changing the landscape of the music industry.

avengers band 001

 

Metallica at The Stone
March 5, 1983

Who knew that the future of heavy metal would be born on a spring night in San Francisco? Metallica had already made a name for themselves as thrashers whose live show took no prisoners, but this date at The Stone felt different. For starters, it was their first show with new bassist Cliff Burton, who would eventually go down as the greatest metal bassist of all time. It was a prelude of what was to come later that summer on Kill ‘Em All, one of the fastest and heaviest albums in history. And—like many of the best moments in American music history—it all started on a sweaty stage in San Francisco.

Rock Against Reagan San Francisco Concerts and Demonstrations
Democratic National Convention
July 1984

The 1984 National Democratic Convention in San Francisco saw some unusual characters outside the building where the members of the party met. Among the large crowd assembled for demonstrations and marches, a man dressed as “a lobster confessed to one of the local papers that his costume was impractical for a march. ‘It’s more for standing in place and doing a little break dancing. It’s hard to be a lobster these days in the city.’” This crustacean would be one of numerous people dressed up for an “All Species parade”. Others joined the all species costumes with outfits such as “a bunch of transvestites in nun costumes [who] performed an exorcism of [the evangelical Southern Baptist pastor and televangelist] Jerry Falwell.” Along with all of these people expressing their concerns towards the America around them; the streets around the convention center in San Francisco also included “a seven-hour punk rock concert, ‘Rock against Reagan,’ featuring such artists as The Dead Kennedys.

July-1984-stage-diver-at-rock-against-racism-concert-in-front-of-Democratic-Convention

Stage diver at RAR across from Moscone Center, in what was then a vacant lot. The buildings that encircled the lot all had military personel with machine guns watching us all the time

The first presidential term of Ronald Reagan was coming to an end and in hope to prevent another term, the Youth International Party, known as the Yippies, from New York City created the “Rock Against Reagan” (RAR) tour. The group toured all across the United States from 1983-1984, leading up to the presidential election. The shows featured some of the most popular punk bands of the era including: The Dead Kennedys from San Francisco, the young trio from San Pedro, California known as the Minutemen, the Crucifucks from Lansing, Michigan, the Dicks and Millions of Dead Cops from Austin, Texas, and Reagan Youth―whose name played off of Hitler’s Youth―from New York. The tour had more than just free shows to see some of the biggest acts in punk rock, however. RAR also registered voters, presented informative films on topics such as American imperialism, political speakers, and even comedy; with the later to come popular comedian Whoopi Goldberg performing during the tour’s 1983 show at Dolores Park in San Francisco.2 As one tour spokesman shared with a Florida newspaper, the shows were also to generate “proceeds from accompanying T-shirt and art sales . . . to be used for the cause.” The “cause” in question was simple: prevent another four years of the Reagan administration.

It may have been in San Francisco, at the Democratic National Convention in July of 1984, where the punk movement reached the apex of political engagement. As the convention met opposition from numerous left wing groups outside; inside according to the title of an editorial “wasn’t a circus, but was one great show.”  If inside the convention was not a “circus” surely the show outside was. Peaceful protests went on throughout the week of the convention, however, July 19th marked a police crackdown on the crowds that amassed on San Francisco’s streets.

The day started with a march, “held by a marijuana group and members of a coalition called the War Chest, which was protesting [military-industry] business dealings of top Democratic Party leaders.” As these peaceful protesters reached closer to the convention center, they were met by police and “booked for investigation of obstructing traffic.” These criminal charges, however, were claimed to be faulty with demonstrators pleading that, “they were forced to block the street when police herded them into groups.” Hearing the calls of injustice, a “second protest march was hastily arranged to demand release of the first demonstrators and was announced at [the] ‘Rock Against Reagan’ punk music concert outside the convention hall.” As the protesting march reached upwards to five-hundred people, the crowd began marching several blocks to the Hall of Justice where the protesters from the earlier march were being held. “Chanting ‘No KKK, No Fascist USA’”―the popular slogan for demonstrators the week of the convention―and being accompanied by a “papier-mache Trojan donkey colored green and brown like Army Fatigues.” The marchers were met by a force of one hundred police officers. “Within minutes, Police Capt. Richard Shippy declared over a bullhorn that the rally was an unlawful assembly and ordered [the protesters] . . . to disperse.” By the end of the second march 369 people total had been arrested. Billy Nessen, a twenty- seven-year-old who partook in the event, was quoted saying: “There was no order to disperse.” He added that the purpose was to protest the connection between several corporations and the De[m]ocratic Party, the war machine, and South Africa.”

Police-pressure-Salvador-demonstrators-at-Hilton Polbhem1$trojan-donkey Polbhem1$wartoys-1984-war-chest-tour Polbhem1$no-more-hiroshimas-1984-wct Polbhem1$eowf-banner Polbhem1$eowf-handbill  Cops-pepper-spraying-protestors-at-anti-Gulf-War-demo-1981-downtown-SF-by-Keith-HolmesMounted-police-against-Salvador-demo-w-anti-Kissinger-sign

The outcome of the protests in San Francisco triggered an alarm for the Republicans who held their convention in Dallas the following month. Dallas prepared for a large assembly of protesters by bringing in extra law enforcement and clearing out the city’s jails. The Dead Kennedys were coming to the town where John F. Kennedy himself was assassinated! Escorting the band would be the “Rock Against Reagan” show and hundreds if not thousands of protesting punks. In addition, there were also concerns over how the pro-Reagan supporters and anti-Reagan demonstrators would interact during the week of the convention.

Republican National Convention, Dallas
The outcome of the demonstrations outside the DNC in San Francisco resulted in a large amount of arrests, but punks had been noticed by the media. Police had harassed the protestors the whole week leading up to the convention but they did not divide their spirit. The rallying of punks to join with others towards a common cause stirred up the sense that something positive may in fact come from their effort. Demonstrating against the Democratic Party’s growing connections with the military industrial complex was one thing, but they were not the head of the beast. It was the Republicans―and more importantly to the cultural rebellion of punk, Ronald Reagan―that was the prized target. Yet although the punk community showed hype towards the upcoming Republican National Convention (RNC) in Dallas, obstacles of counter-protests would prevent the same commotion that RAR stirred in San Francisco.

Before MRR even published a full story on the outcome of the events at the DNC in San Francisco, their July 1984 issue was already informing punks of the upcoming RAR show and demonstrations the following month in Dallas.

Read Comments(No Comments) | Add Comment

Food Delivery, Food Courts, The New Black

 

The Next Big Thing and an Unsuspecting yet Dubious Populace

Regardless of what developers, realtors, or those that they have purchased on the Board Of Supervisors will tell you, what makes San Francisco such a great place is it’s historic resistance to change, particularly change for greed’s sake. People come from all over the world to see the Victorians, the cable cars, the street cars, the parks, the mom and pop retail stores, the independent restaurants, the quaint neighborhoods built in a human scale. These are all beautiful creations that compliment a healthy lifestyle, they invigorate and stimulate us. The same thing cannot be said for boxy glass and steel condos that have been and continue to be built all over the city as if there is no tomorrow. There is no time to take a step back and reflect on how these cold and visually insulting behemoths will ultimately take away our sense of community, draining us of what we have taken for granted for so long: our delight in moving around what has always been such an engaging and aesthetically pleasing city. But although no one thought that there would be so much change happening so quickly, it is here all around us. Few are happy about it, but a small group of people have clearly grown very rich as a result of all of this change, and they don’t care who they had to evict to make it happen, so take it or leave it. They moneyed interests have won, and the city is being remade so that they might benefit.

There is yet another new change that is now being thrust upon us without any time to reflect or to discuss how the change will affect our society or or community. It isn’t the ride-sharing services that employ the under employed. No these services whose drivers are now trying to make ends meet in a city that was stolen out from underneath them are no longer new, in fact they are legal now, and I hope will start paying taxes and maybe insure their drivers. It isn’t Air BnB, again many of the people renting out their living spaces to out of town travelers, are also just trying to make ends meet in a city that is no longer theirs. No, the newest thing to be shoved down our throats as the newest thing on this race to the bottom,  is a revolution in how we choose to eat. Two new ways to eat are being deployed at a rate faster than atrocious condos can be built. Are they necessarily bad?  You be the judge:

First up, we have a slew of new home or office meal delivery services, many promise gourmet meals delivered to you in as little as 10 minutes for around $10 or less. Huh?

Munchery (munchery.com), a company that’s been around since 2010 but has taken off recently —  the company fills about 4,500 orders a day and claims double-digit month-over-month growth. Munchery calls on seven staff and around 35 part-time chefs to make a wide variety of main dishes, sides, kids meals, and desserts that you order on the website or the iOS app at least two hours and up to two days ahead of time. The cost is around $10-$12 per entree, $2.95-$4.95 per delivery for most of the Bay Area, and it offers a wide selection and delivery range. The items are made earlier that day and delivered chilled. You have to heat them up yourself.
Sprig (eatsprig.com)  The start-up’s easy iOS interface offers three rotating meals a day prepared by Nate Keller, formerly head chef at Google’s cafeteria. I ordered chicken agridolce with brown rice and spicy broccoli, and French onion shredded beef with carrots and green beans (there was a vegetarian option, a quiche, but it looked a little lackluster in the photo). Every dish is $10, with a $2 delivery fee. The hot food was at my door within 12 minutes of ordering. It was basically magic.
Spoon Rocket (spoonrocket.com)  Started in the East Bay by two college students delivers meals (lunch) around $8.00 in about 10 minutes.
Chefler (chefler.com) Delivers “healthy” meals to buy professionals and parents but they are not currently accepting customers.
Plated (plated.com) is one of several services that deliver food and recipes to your door, you would  then follow the instructions and prepare  the ingredients yourself. Not sure if having someone who is so uncreative that they can’t manage to find their own recipe or choose their own ingredients prepare anything in the kitchen is a good thing.

Having tried these services, I have to say, the food is okay, not great, but it could be worse. I feel for the drivers, you know they aren’t being paid much and I’m told that you are not supposed to tip them. In a city with a restaurant on every block I find it hard to imagine these businesses being able to compete, but I wish them all the best of luck. The saddest thing is that all of these services encourage the consumer to not leave their home or office and makes it convenient to not interact with real people in the outside world. In our increasingly fragmented society where more and more people never look up from whatever screen they are using, this does not bode well.


7a6ad03047e77b982627cc6830e63919
Unknown-4 Unknown-5Unknown-3

images-6images-5
images-1

 





 

Food Courts, I mean Food Halls Invade 

Next up, we have  a deluge of Food Courts heading our way, but they have been made over to look like Whole Foods meets the Ferry Building to make the dot com crowd feel safe, and they have been rebranded oddly enough as Food Halls:

 

Second Act (the former Red Vic Theatre)

Haight Street between Cole and Shrader Streets

The Haight’s Red Vic Movie House was a legendary place, you could watch movies on couches and recliners, and eat real popcorn with real butter. Now it is a mid-sized food court called, The Second Act Marketplace, a food stall and events space inside the now-defunct theater. Second Act is designed to serve as a neighborhood hub, offering coffee, juice and food options alongside book readings, film screening, shows and more. Betsy and Jack Rix, who were part-owners of the original Red Vic, are behind the metamorphosis, which brings five food vendors to the new space. We wish them luck.

post_display_cropped_8b8107eabccaa79efdc0b10722b16e1b

 


 

 

The Market Hall

Mission Bay

 

Forget that Oakland has already had a venue called Market Hall, albeit the official name is Rockridge Market Hall, and they have been in business since 1987. Not to mention, like the name implies, Market Hall in Rockridge is actually a market and not a food court. Forget about that Market Hall for second and remember that big sterile food halls are really the new black, as we’ve seen in the recent announcements of South Beach’s The Market Hall,  This non-market  which is also not a hall, is from the creative brain of Los Angeles Developer Tony Riviera, who comes with an idea and a 1990-ish look that would probably look great in the Southern California wasteland or San Mateo yet look completely out of place in San Francisco, except in maybe the new UCSF wasteland in South Beach/ Mission Bay. This impersonal and icy-cold,  huge and vapid space looks like the interior of a German airport but not as interesting. The only saving grace about this endeavor and this whole disgusting area, where no true San Franciscan would be caught dead, is that if the Big-One hits, it’s all going into the quick-sand and will return to SF Bay. So pray for an earthquake before it’s too late.

 


The-Market-Hall

 

Twats Inside

The Twitter building has turned out to be a major job killer and a curse on the Mid-Market neighborhood. When the Twit nest first opened, the rents all around the immediate area went up, doubling and tripling almost over night, many restaurants closed immediately. But many struggled to stay open, believing that the the twatty employees would become customers. What they didn’t realize, was that much like home-schooled children, the Twit-staff rarely leave their building and do not mix much with the neighborhood. Their food is prepared for them inside the building and served to them for free. So it was with surprise that we heard about the food court that the Tweets are opening in their building. One great thing we heard, The Cadillac Bar and Grill is being resurrected inside the food court:  The Cadillac Bar & Grill, a revival of a Mexican restaurant that’s been closed since 1999. Inside Scoop got the details from owner Michael Rodriguez, who’s ready to revisit the concept 15 years after the last fajita was served.

images-3

The plan is for the revived Cadillac to occupy a huge, 8,000-square-foot space, including a 50-foot bar pouring margaritas and the like. Family-style taco and fajita plates will dominate the menu (half of which will date to the original incarnation, and half of which will be updated for modern tastes), and a mesquite-fired grill will be in action. With a big patio, mariachis roaming the room, and tables designed for groups, it’s definitely meant to be a party atmosphere, in line with that of the original (which lasted for 17 years before meeting its end in the Moscone Center expansion and redevelopment). It’s set to reopen sometime this fall.


 

 

 The Hall (L.A. North)

6th and Market Streets

walking-9408223-o

 

One on of the most dangerous and sketchy blocks in the city, a giant Food Court has been announced: Called The Hall, it’s taking over the former billiards parlor at 6th and Market, and comes from entrepreneurs Ted Wilson (a wine distribution exec and vintner) and Scott Peterson (a former chef at Bocadillos, Bizou and Chow). Matt Semmelhack (AQ, TBD) is also consulting on the project, which will feature seven vendors, including a seafood restaurant, an Indian spot, coffee and pastries, and more.

Here are the seven participating vendors:

· Fine & Rare: A concept from Wilson and Peterson, this spot will offer Southern-influenced seafood dishes sourced as locally as possible, as well as a raw bar and a wine shop with bottles to go.

· The Whole Beast: A brick-and-mortar incarnation of the popular food stand and pop-up, featuring dishes created from whole animals.

· Little Green Cyclo: A food truck gone perm, with Vietnamese dishes like pho, banh mi, and spring rolls, as well as bubble tea and housemade sweets.

· Raj + Singh: Curries and other Indian fare, including vegan and vegetarian options, and naan freshly baked on-site.

· Cassia: Moroccan-Peruvian fusion in dishes like a meatball masala bowl or a coconut pork pita pocket, from the folks behind the Fuki food truck.

· Dignitá: Coffee (including cold brew), pastries, and healthy snacks.

· Anchor Brewers and Distillers: An on-site bar, featuring wine and beer from the Anchor portfolio.

images-4

All of this fare will be offered in a communal setting, with picnic tables, trees located both indoors and out, and what’s described as an “indoor-meets-outdoor, rustic-industrial vibe.” An outdoor grill will apparently cook many of the meats and vegetables, which all the involved vendors are attempting to source as locally as possible. The Hall says it plans to land by the end of September; we’ll have an update later today with more info.

 


 

 

Castro Food Court Hall  

 

Market and 15th at Sanchez Streets
Project yet to be officially named

 

2200-Market-Street

The Century Building at 2200 Market. Bandido’s from the owners of Hi-Tops has opened on Leticia’s old spot.

Next door to “No-Tell” MotelBeck’s Motor Lodge, on the spot that used to house, “Home“, is a building that I wanted to hate. The owner of the now defunct Rosie’s Cantina owns the land and she didn’t want a building that didn’t fit in with the neighborhood, and in my opinion, she did a great job and the building is stunning and a good fit for the surrounding area. The main floor of the building houses an upscale restaurant that just opened it’s doors called, “Bandidos.” So far the clientele appears to be mainly gay men, probably because this restaurant has been opened by the owner’s of the wildly popular gay bar across the street, “Hi-Tops.” So perhaps this is a new gay bar in the hood? One thing is for sure, this intersection needs a street light or two to see all the pedestrians in the cross walk at night.

The building itself is a ‘Flatiron Building”, which is a triangular shaped building built on an irregular shaped lot. This intersection is where Market, 15th and Sanchez meet, so the lots at the intersections are triangle shaped. A new building directly across from this structure is also a flat iron and points back across the intersection, and across Market Street on the current vacant lot next to the Swedish American Hall, a third flat-iron with the same style of architecture is going to be  built. Although I wanted to hate it, it sounds like it could be very cool when all three buildings will be finished. Let’s see if I can find an artist’s rendition of the yet to be built building…

 

2198-Market-Street-Rendering-Corner

An artist’s rendition of the third flat-iron building to be built at this intersection. This one is a little bland, but at least they are incorporating below market rate housing on-site

 

Ugh…No imagination in this building, no detail at all, just bland and boxy. But am told that there will be lots of bicycle parking. So in other words, they will all be parking their cars on the street. Too bad this city has no leadership worth anything…

But back to the building across the street…

 

 


2175 market 1-9-10

An artist’s rendering of the new building.

 


The Bay Area Reporter says that the new multi-use building, which is located at 2175 Market Street (at 15th)  and is just completing construction, will feature a 3,895-square-foot emporium-style marketplace, to be shared by a collection of food vendors. The new space will join behemoth-to-be Market Square (that’s the Twitter building) and the smaller Second Act and 331 Cortland in adopting a shared-space model. This building is especially hated by it’s neighbors to the south and south southwest because it completely blocks the view of the entire neighborhood. There used to be a gas station here just a few months ago…

Though the specific vendors are still being decided, the planning report notes that the concept will be similar to the Ferry Building or a “European-style” marketplace, with a bar rumored to be part of the upcoming plans. A formula retail clause will restrict the vendors to local businesses only. There’s also an adjacent restaurant space whose tenant is yet to be determined. The building is expected to open its units to tenants in the fall; updates on potential tenants will follow as soon as they’re announced.


 

 

331 Cortland Marketplace

Bernal Heights

331 Cortland

So we began in the Haight and looked at a smaller scale food court that began organically and brings something to the neighborhood without dominating it or destroying the eco-system that is already in place. We end with more evidence that the Food Hall concept can work if done right. In fact, besides Haight Street, it is currently working very well in Bernal Heights at 331 Cortland Avenue. It has been open now for about 5 years, it doesn’t have the cutting-edge restaurant scene of the Mission District or the tourist pull of the Ferry Plaza. But an influx of innovative food companies, embraced by a community with a fervor for locally grown businesses and food, has turned the neighborhood into something that would have been unthinkable a few years ago: an epicurean destination.

Alyson Jacks moved to Bernal Heights 20 years ago when the neighborhood was best known for its drug trade; the commercial strip, Cortland Avenue, had only a handful of unremarkable restaurants and liquor stores.

“In my time living here it’s been an extraordinary transformation,” said Ms. Jacks, wearing a black sweatshirt with “Bernal Heights” in gold letters. “I don’t have to get in my car to get anything.”

Local residents trace its initial revival in the early 1990s to the opening of Good Life Grocery, a midsize market, and Liberty Cafe, which later drew a following for its upscale twist on chicken potpie. After young families, attracted to the neighborhood’s tiny Victorian homes and narrow, walkable streets, created a real estate boom a few years ago, others built on the culinary foundation that had helped spark the turnaround.

The latest batch of food businesses focus on handmade products. Last month, an indoor marketplace at 331 Cortland Avenue opened with six kiosks inside 1,000 square feet. At Bernal Cutlery, Josh Donald slowly sharpens knives with Japanese whetstones behind an ornately carved wooden counter. Paulie’s Pickling sells East Coast-style deli sandwiches from a space barely larger than a pickle crock. Ichi Lucky Cat Deli offers fish and prepared sushi rolls. El Porteño Empanadas fills beef empanadas with meat from Prather Ranch and sweet ones with banana and dulce de leche. There’s also an organic produce stand and Wholesome Bakery, which sells vegan and gluten-free sweets.

The owner of the building, Debra Resnik, was inspired to create the market while volunteering at La Cocina, a San Francisco nonprofit organization that supports food entrepreneurs. The vendors previously had street food stands or worked in catering, and Most of the vendors live within blocks of the market.

“I love that it’s all artisan food, and I love supporting local people that we live around,” said Joey Bennett, who has lived in the neighborhood for eight years and brings her young children to the marketplace.

180s



Related articles

 

 

Read Comments(No Comments) | Add Comment

Pop Gourmet Food Festival at J Pop Summit 2014

POP GOURMET FOOD FESTIVAL

POP GOURMET FOOD FESTIVAL
 



July 19 (Sat) & July 20 (Sun), 11am-6pm
on Post & Webster at Fillmore Street

POP GOURMET is a food festival that serves up a mix of Japanese delicacies and gourmet foods from San Francisco. Come enjoy popular local food trucks, exclusive sake tasting by select sake makers and distributors, a wide range of Japanese beverages, and Ramen Matsuri, a ramen fair where you can try different ramen from all regions of Japan!

▼ Click each area for more information!
★ Area 1:  SAKE TASTING
★ Area 2:  FOOD TRUCKS
★ Area 3:  BITES & SNACKS
★ Area 4:  BEVERAGES
★ Area 5:  RAMEN STREET



● SAKE TASTING AREA*
The highlight of POP GOURMET is the Sake Tasting Area! This is a very rare opportunity: the biggest sake-makers and distributors will get together to show off their latest sake and sake-related products. You can try all of them and find your favorite one!
(Supported by Consulate General of Japan in San Francisco)

◉ Admission fee: $10.00 
* Participants must be at least 21 years old (IDs will be checked)
-Participating companies:
Choya Umesyu USA, Inc. / JFC International, Inc. / Gekkeikan Sake, USA / Hosoda Bros. Inc / Iichiko /Japan Seiko Glass Joto Sake / Kikkoman USA / N.A. Sales Company / Nishimoto Trading, Co. / Ozeki Sake, USA / Takara Sake USA / True Sake
                                         



● FOOD TRUCKS
San Francisco’s favorite restaurants-on-wheels gather again at J-POP SUMMIT Festival 2014!
-Participating companies:
Adam’s Grub Truck / BACON BACON / The Chairman Truck / THE CREME BRÛLÉE CART / Frozen Kuhsterd / Garden Creamery / Hiyaaa! / Hongry Kong / JapaCurry / J-Shack / Keep Rolling / KOREAN BOBCHA / Phat Thai / Qui Chef / We Sushi (in alphabetical order)

                          




● Bites & Snacks
Come enjoy hot healthy dishes, cold smoothes, Japanese favorite sweets & snacks, and more!
-Participating companies:
Azuma Foods / Megumi Natto / Meiji / Moffle Waffle / ONIGILLY

        




● JAPANESE BEVERAGE AREA
A place to enjoy Japanese beer, cocktails and other non-alcoholic beverages!
-Participating companies:
Takara “J POP” / Sapporo / Ito-en

      



● RAMEN STREET organized by Ramen Yokocho Association
Who wants Ramen? We do! You do! Ramen is now all the rage in San Francisco! Come stroll down the first ever Ramen Street in San Francisco and experience first hand the taste of Japanese ramen! There are six ramen shops that have gathered from Los Angeles, Las Vegas, San francisco, and even Japan! Every ramen is special; each shop has a unique taste that will leave you wanting more!
So who wants to try some ramen (many different bowls)?
▼ See participating restaurants below!

RAMEN STREET

Ramen Yokocho Official Website: RamenYokochoUS.com/
Facebook
Read Comments(No Comments) | Add Comment

What the Hills Y’all: Adventures of a Texas Girl living in San Francisco

what the hills y’all: Explore San Francisco Food Tour, Mission North 4 Replies What the Hills Y’all: Adventures of a Texas girl living in San Francisco Have you ever been on a food tour? I’ve never been on one, but since I live in San Francisco in a mecca of food comas, I thought it would Read the full article…


Tosca, reviewed

TOSCA CAFE Bloomfield and Friedman have shifted lately into empire-building mode. They’re actively looking for another space in New York (with some recent hitches) beyond the four Manhattan restaurants they already run, and there were brief rumors about the duo opening their first venture in Los Angeles. Their western expansion already began early last year when the two Read the full article…


Looking Back at the Oldest Building in San Francisco Friday, SF Curbed, by Alex Bevk

1856 Then photo: SAN FRANCISCO HISTORY CENTER, SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY Public spaces change fast here in San Francisco, and for better or worse, it can be pretty crazy when you see what the City used to look like. Every week, we’ll bring you Then & Now, a comparison of historic photos of the Bay Area with Read the full article…


Bay Area Billionaires 2014

BAY AREA BILLIONAIRES, 2014 AKA The 1% PUBLISHED 13 FEBRUARY 2014 sfluxe.com Today we present our 3rd Annual “Bay Area Billionaires” list for 2014, which has increased this year thanks to the thriving tech world and several high-profile IPOs. The following estimates are compiled from information provided by Forbes Magazine (September 2013 numbers), Bloomberg.com, the Read the full article…