GOLDEN FIRE HYDRANT

After the earthquake and fire had wreaked havoc on the city for almost 3 days. A fire hydrant was found to be in working order above Mission Park, which was full of refugees. The citizens working with the fire department made a fire line along 20th Street. (At the same time a similar story was playing out on the other side of The Mission District...see nineteen.html)
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The Golden Fire Hydrant (one of six golden fire hydrants in the City) at 20th and Church St.
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Mission District 1856
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Mission District 1860s
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Much of the Mission was still used for small scale agriculture. Some areas were more developed. This is the view from Potrero Hill looking at a more developed area
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  EARTHQUAKE!!!
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Howard St (S Van Ness) The Earthquake was bad in the Mission District
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Many houses listed one way or the other. Howard St (S Van Ness)
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The buried waterways in this area made the ground very unstable. Howard St (S Van Ness)
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Howard (South Van Ness) and 17th - Then and Now
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  But the day after the quake most residents went about their lives. They were highly inconvenienced but their world was still pretty much the same, just a bit damaged. Howard St (S Van Ness)
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Some figured they would have to rebuild but it could have been much worse they reminded themselves. Howard St (S Van Ness)
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Howard Street (S Van Ness) There were very few injuries and even less fatalities
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Howard Street
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  On Howard Street which became South Van Ness, some buildings were completely fine. The wooden homes seemed to be able to take a good tremor
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  A few houses were unsafe, so neighbors who fared well took those who did not into their homes. At least they had shelter to offer...For now
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Not knowing about the fire that was about to descend upon them, this group seems confident in rebuilding their future
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Oddly, most of the Churches were deemed unsafe, so here is a Mass being held outdoors in the Mission District. The Irish and the Italians of the area, prayed for help rebuilding, and thanked their God for not creating a worse distaster. They were grateful that the worst was over. They were shaken but still alive, still had their homes, their families, their communities. For a few more hours that is. Little did they know, that the worst was yet to come...
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Dolores Street, the day after the quake,  People are going about their business. Here some ladies are preparing food in their stove moved onto the street. They moved their stoves out doors because of the fire danger caused by broken chimneys.  It must have taken a long time to move the stove and then prepare food in that way. Time that in retrospect I am sure they wish they had spent preparing for the inferno that was about to consume everything they own
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The Valencia Hotel had collapsed into the marshy wetland upon which it was built. At least 7 people were killed. People rushed to help and spent many hours removing debris by hand to get to trapped victims. A few days later the death toll at this hotel was officially changed to 40
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Another shot of the Valencia Street Hotel, it looks like the rescue has ended at this point. Which means,the fire must be on the way. They would have been able to smell and see it coming towards them as they tried to rescue the survivors trapped beneath the rubble. It must have been difficult to leave the screaming victims but the fire was coming straight for them...
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  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Valencia Street, then and now
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  More Mission District  buildings that collapsed into the quagmire, mostly on Valencia street which sat directly on top of a latge swath of a creek that was big enough to accomdate boats. I wonder if these people even knew it was below them Here people rush into help in any way they can.
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  More damage
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  On Valencia Street before the fire.
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Looters
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Looters were rampant following the quake.  Troops and newly deputized civilans were soon dispersed with shoot to kill orders. Here are some looters at a Jewelery Store
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Mission High School, before the fire
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Behind the Valencia Street Hotel, fire rages
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Watching from Mission Park
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The fire in the distance, probably the day after the quake. The fires start to spread...There were 50 fires in all, they eventually became one really big fire, visible in Monterey
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Dolores and Market
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  That is the Haight Ashbury burning in t the distance. Photo taken from Buena Vista, one of many fires now burning throughout the city. These people must have been starting to panic. Most structures are wooden and built close to one another and there is no water...The mains are broken.
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The Mint
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Caption reads," Burning of San Francisco Mission District"
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Here people are still watching the fire in the distance, looks like it is at South Van Ness perhaps?
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The only houses here that are not just about to burn to the ground are the 2 or 3 brick structures which have already colllapsed and have formed brick piles in the middle of the street
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Mission Park Refugee Camp 1906 with the HUGE approaching fire in the background. People are on the move now. Every person in these photos is busy carrying something or involved in some other seemingly purposeful activity.
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The Mission from Dolores Park
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Watching the fire from Bernal Hill
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  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Fire on Market Street looking towards Ferry Building
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Panorama of the fire
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  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The fire engine that, with the help of the people, saved the Mission and the City! Note: The soldiers guarding it
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The Mission was saved by 300 volunteers
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 75
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Everything is burnt
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  After the quake, on Market Street, looking south down Dolores Street. Safeway would be to the right
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  And in the beginning refugees trickled in
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  The camp at first was just thrown together
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Here is the makeshift camp with the new Mission High School in the background
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  A refugee family who probably just lost everything
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Refugees
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  At least these people had their sense of humor
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  A refugee family who survived the quake but lost everything in the fire
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  People coped as best they could
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  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Pic says, "Mission Park 20th and Dolores Sts". The camp is beginning to get organized from the look of this pic. Clearly, the fires are over
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Leslie's map of the burned city
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Mission Street after the fire
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Sutter Street, west from Hyde Street
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Post and Grant Streets
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  THe new Post Office on Mission and 7th survived the earthquake and fire despite the buckled streets
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  A typical bread line
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  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Guerrero and 30th
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Downtown damage
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  depending on size, painted green to blend in the park surroundings and rented to families at a cost of $2 to $6 per month. A handful of the shacks still survive. Some have been combined with other shacks to make a decent sized home, one like this recently sold $768,000dddsw
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  After the earthquake, about 16,488 San Franciscans moved into 5,600 government-provided housing built in refugee camps across city parks.  According to historians with The Western Neighborhoods Project" the "shacks" were built by Union carpenters for a cost of approximately $100 to $741 each, continued next slide...
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  2 Earthquake shacks are kept in the Presidio
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  • Golden Fire Hydrant  China plates melted together at the SF FD Museum
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Here is a shot from 1909. The photo is inscribed "NEW San Francisco"
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  One of two horse-drawn steam engines that, with the help of the Mission (Dolores) Park refugees, saved the Mission District! Note: The soldiers guarding it
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Antique Steam Engine
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  1897 FIre Chief's Bugy as used in 1906 Fire
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  1893 Steam Engine as used in 1906 Fire
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  1897 Steam Engine as used in 1906 Fire
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  1902 Water Tower may have been used in 1906 Fire. Very modern for the times
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Tribute to Dennis Sullivan, Fire Chief, killed in earthquake
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  1904 Labor Day Parade, Fallon Building on right with "witches hat"
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Looking down from Dolores and Market towards Valencia. Motor House is at the tip of the arrow
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Motor House under tip of arrow at Valencia and Market
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Fallon Building on left
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Fallon Building 1979
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Fallon Building 1999
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Fallon Building
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Fallon Building
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Falllon Building GLBT Center
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Dedicated to the firefighters and citizens turned firefighters who made a stand at 20th Street and stopped the flames."May their love and devotion for this city be an inspiration for all to follow and their motto "The City that knows how", a light to lead all future generations
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Celebration from Lotta's Fountain
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Celebrating
  • Golden Fire Hydrant  Survivor spraying gold spray paint
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